Recycling

  • Annual Recycling Events

    City of Burnsville Spring Collection Event

    The City of Burnsville hosts a one day spring Appliance & Electronic Collection Event.  This event takes place during the "I Love Burnsville" week, usually at the end of May or the beginning of June.  The event takes place at the City of Burnsville Maintenance Center (13713 Frontier Court) from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.  The items accepted at this event may vary from year to year and may have fees associated with them.  They typically include:

    • Appliances such as washers/dryers, hot water heaters, garbage disposals, trash compactors, ranges/stoves, air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators/freezers, furnaces, microwaves, dehumidifiers, and dishwashers
    • Electronics such as TVs, VCRs, Computers/computer equipment, stereos, cell phones, digital cameras, fax equipment, and electronic games
    • Scrap metal
    • Bicycles

    City of Burnsville & Dakota County Fall Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event

    Hazardous waste is any waste material that can cause serious illness, a threat to human health or harm to the environment if improperly stored, transported or disposed. This includes most products labeled dangerous, flammable, poison, combustible and corrosive are considered hazardous waste.  The City of Burnsville & Dakota County hosts a one day Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event in the fall of each year for residents to dispose of their hazardous waste.  The event takes place at the City of Burnsville Maintenance Facility (13713 Frontier Court) from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.  All Dakota County Residents are welcome to participate in this event.  The items accepted at this event may vary from year to year and may have fees associated with them.  They typically include:

    • Household hazardous waste such as aerosols, antifreeze, batteries, cleaners, fluorescent light bulbs, gasoline or other fuels, lawn and garden products, mercury thermometers, oil, paint—latex or oil, paint thinner, pesticides, propane tanks/gas cylinders, and thermometers, thermostats
    • Tires (please separate rims if possible)
    • Electronics
    • Scrap Metal
    • Bicycles
    • Appliances
    • Document destruction (documents confidentially destroyed by a certified shredding company).  Accepted items:  computer paper, copy paper, envelopes, letterhead, notepad/legal paper, fax paper, junk mail, file folders, phone message notes.  Paper clips and staples DO NOT need to be removed.  Non- acceptable items: carbon paper, laminated paper, phone books, magazines, tissue paper, rubber bands, metal binders, hard-cover books, plastic, cardboard boxes.

    City of Lakeville & Dakota County Spring Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event

    Hazardous waste is any waste material that can cause serious illness, a threat to human health or harm to the environment if improperly stored, transported or disposed. This includes most products labeled dangerous, flammable, poison, combustible and corrosive are considered hazardous waste.  The City of Lakeville & Dakota County hosts a one day Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event in the Spring of each year for residents to dispose of their hazardous waste.  The event takes place at the City of Lakeville Central Maintenance Facility (CMF) located at 7570 179th St. W. from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.  All Dakota County Residents are welcome to participate in this event.  The items accepted at this event may vary from year to year and may have fees associated with them.  They typically include:

    • Household hazardous waste such as aerosols, antifreeze, batteries, cleaners, fluorescent light bulbs, gasoline or other fuels, lawn and garden products, mercury thermometers, oil, paint—latex or oil, paint thinner, pesticides, propane tanks/gas cylinders, and thermometers, thermostats
    • Electronics
    • Appliances
    • Document destruction (documents confidentially destroyed by a certified shredding company).  Accepted items:  computer paper, copy paper, envelopes, letterhead, notepad/legal paper, fax paper, junk mail, file folders, phone message notes.  Paper clips and staples DO NOT need to be removed.  Non- acceptable items: carbon paper, laminated paper, phone books, magazines, tissue paper, rubber bands, metal binders, hard-cover books, plastic, cardboard boxes.
  • Appliances

    Minnesota law prohibits appliances from being placed with household garbage because they have components that are harmful to human health and the environment.  Major appliances no longer in usable condition must be recycled. The term "major appliance" includes the following items:

    • Air conditionersStove
    • Clothes washers and dryers
    • Dishwashers
    • Water heaters
    • Furnaces
    • Microwaves
    • Refrigerators
    • Freezers
    • Ovens, ranges and stoves
    • Garbage disposals
    • Trash compactors
    • Dehumidifiers
    • Heat pumps

    Recycling Appliances

    Option 1:  Some retailers will take and recycle old appliances when you purchase a new one.  Utilize these programs when available.

    Option 2: Bring your appliances to one of the following appliance recyclers.  Fees apply, call business for pricing and hours.

    A-1 Recycling
    1423 Lowry Ave N
    Minneapolis, MN 55411
    612-521-1370
    www.a1recycling.net

    Advanced Recyclers
    8980 S Hwy 149
    Inver Grove Heights, MN 55077
    651-454-9215
    www.jrsappliance.com

    Certified Recycling
    14305 Ewing Ave
    Burnsville, MN 55306
    952-894-1448
    www.certifiedappliance.com

    Plaza TV and Appliance, Inc.
    946 S Robert St
    West Saint Paul, MN 55118
    651-457-1196
    www.plazatv.com

    Option 3:If you do not have a way to transport an appliance to a recycling facility, call your garbage hauler or one of the appliance recyclers above to schedule a pick-up for a one-time fee. 

  • Backyard Composting

    compost bin with vegetable scrapsComposting is nature’s way of recycling materials.  It is the natural breakdown of organic wastes by bacteria, fungi, worms, and other organisms under controlled conditions.  Besides conserving resources and diverting organic material from landfills, backyard composting can save you money.  By diverting your household’s food waste from the garbage, you can reduce the size and cost of your garbage container.

    Recipe for composting:

    Materials & Ingredients Needed:
    Compost container
    Stirring tool: shovel or pitchfork
    Water
    “Brown” compostable materials (see below for list)
    “Green” compostable materials (see below for list)

    Instructions for Successful Composting:

    1. Construct your compost container.  Select a dry, shady spot near a water source to place your compost bin.
    2. Add “green” compostable material.  This includes fruit and vegetable scraps, bread products, grass clippings, plant trimmings and weeds.  These materials are high in carbon.
    3. Add “brown” compostable material.  This includes fallen leaves, straw, sawdust, wood chips, and twigs.  These materials are high in nitrogen.
    4. Mix. Turn the compost with a stirring tool regularly; no more frequently than once a week.  This prevents unpleasant odors and quickens decomposition.  If strong odors occur despite regular turning, add a bulking agent (straw, sawdust or dry leaves).  Add water if pile seems too dry (compost should appear “damp” but not soggy).
    5. Use!  The result of composting is a dark, crumbly, earthy-smelling mixture that can be used as a fertilizer, mulch or in a potting mix.

    Helpful Hints

    • “Brown” compostable materials include fallen leaves, straw, coffee grounds, wood chips, twigs and sawdust.  These materials are high in carbon.
    •  “Green” compostable materials include weeds, grass clippings, plant trimmings and food scraps.  They are high in nitrogen.
    • The ideal ratio for “green” to “brown” material in your bin is generally considered to be a 50/50 mix (1:1 ratio).  However, 1:2 or 2:1 ratios will still allow your pile to compost.  Disproportionate amounts of “green” can lead to strong odors, and too much “brown” will dry out your pile and stop the composting process. 
    • Coffee grounds are high in both carbon and nitrogen, so they are categorized as both green and brown, depending on whom you ask.  Paper coffee filters can also be added to your compost pile.
    • Do not add the following items to compost container: grease, oil, fat, bones, dairy products, meat or pet waste.

    To get your own backyard composting bin:

    Information on building compost containers (Missouri Extension Services).

    The Dakota County Recycling Zonein Eagan sells compost bins.  Their number is: 651-905-4520.

    Check at your local garden center for compost bins.

    Check out a Sustainability Man video about composting:

     

  • Batteries

    Some batteries contain no harmful materials and other batteries do; please take the time to know the difference. 

    People use more and more household batteries.  The average person owns about two button batteries, ten normal (A, AA, AAA, C D 9V, etc.) batteries and throws out about eight household batteries per year.  About three billion batteries are sold annually in the U.S.

    Types of Batteries and Disposal Methods:

    • Non-rechargeable alkaline and carbon zinc (heavy duty) batteries may be placed in the garbage.  They no longer contain hazardous material and do not need to be recycled.
    • Lithium, button, and rechargeable nickel cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries are toxic and should not be placed in the garbage. They should be recycled. 
    • Vehicle batteries for cars, boats, snowmobiles, etc. are illegal to throw in the garbage and must be recycled.  By MN State Law, businesses that sell lead-acid batteries are required to accept up to five used batteries per person at no charge. 

    To recycle batteries, bring them to the Dakota County Recycling Zone located in Eagan. 

    Invest in Rechargeable Batteries

    Over its useful life, each rechargeable battery may substitute for hundreds of single-use batteries.  All rechargeable batteries are recyclable.  While they may cost more up front, they'll save money in the long run because they last longer than disposables. 

    Here are some tips to get the most out of your rechargeable batteries:

    • Follow the charging guidelines provided by the manufacturer
    • Let a discharged battery cool (or warm) to room temperature before recharging
    • Recharge batteries only when they are near to fully discharged
  • Building & Construction Materials

    The Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity ReStore is a retail outlet where new, surplus and like new building materials are sold below retail prices.  The ReStore operates exclusively on donated products and is able to provide significant discounts to the public. 

    If you have used or new building products and construction materials that are still in good condition, consider donating to ReStore to be reused, instead of throwing them away where they will sit in a landfill or get burned in the incinerator.  Or, if you are looking for some items for your home, take a look at what they are selling instead of buying new; not only will you save money but you'll save resoures too!

    The inventory at the ReStore often changes, but some products are usually always welcome as donations or available for purchase:

    • stack of interior and exterior doorsWindows
    • Doors (Exterior and Interior)
    • Carpet
    • Ceramic Tile
    • Laminate, Wood and Vinyl Flooring
    • Cabinets
    • Vanities
    • Assorted Hardware Products
    • Toilets
    • Sinks

    Call for more information on products: 612-588-3820.

  • Carpet

    rolls of old carpetingIf you recently removed carpeting from your home, you have a number of options to dispose of it.  Bro-Tex, a textile recycling company in Saint Paul, gives you the opportunity to recycle your unwanted carpeting at a number of locations around the Twin Cities metropolitan area.  To recycle your carpet with Bro-Tex, it must meet the following requirements:

    • Carpet must be dry, clean, and debris-free
    • Carpet and carpet padding must be separated
    • Carpet must be rolled or bagged; rolls should be a maximum of six feet in length and should be tied with string or twine -- no duct tape.

    Notaccepted:  

    • rubber-backed, carpet tile or other rigid flooring
    • carpet scraps or trimmings
    • carpet with tack strips, nails or staples

    This carpet will be recycled into new carpet, plastic parts such as drain pipes, acoustic matting or absorbent products for spills. The following businesses have a drop-off location for carpet and carpet padding to be recycled by Bro-Tex.

    Bro-Tex, Inc.
    840 Hampden Ave
    Saint Paul, MN 55114
    651-645-5721 ext 331
    carpet.brotex.com
    Drop-off container open 24/7
    Fee: $10 per car or pickup truck load

    Carver County Environmental Center
    116 Peavy Cir
    Chaska, MN 55318
    952-361-1800
    www.co.carver.mn.us
    Call for hours
    Fee: $10 per load

    If recycling is not an option, take carpet to a transfer siteor call your garbage hauler to schedule a pick-up for a one-time fee.

  • Clothing Donation Sites

    There are many reuse and donation opportunities for gently used clothing. 

    Consignment shops - the following businesses accept clothing for consignment:

    Clothes Mentor
    952-953-3835
    14629 County Road 11
    Burnsville, MN 55337

    Once Upon a Child
    952-432-8802
    1100 E. County Road 42
    Burnsville, MN 55337Clothing in donation box example

    Plato’s Closet
    952-431-8494
    14603 County Road 11
    Burnsville, MN 55337

    Second Tyme Around Fashions
    651-438-3863
    1745 North Frontage Road
    Hastings, MN

    Turn Style Consignment Store
    952-898-1042
    Cobblestone Court
    14150 Nicollet Ave. S.
    Burnsville, MN 55337

    Turn Style Consignment Store
    952-891-3331
    7367 179th St. W.
    Lakeville, MN

    Thrift stores and non-profits - the following accept clothing items as a donation:

    Arc Greater Twin Cities
    1650 White Bear Ave. N.
    St. Paul, MN 55106
    651-788-8300

    C.H.A.P. Thrift Store  
    952-890-8222
    2020 E. Highway 13
    Burnsville, MN 55337

    Courage Center
    763-520-06603
    3915 Golden Valley Road
    Minneapolis, MN 55422

    Dakota Woodlands
    651-456-9110
    3430 Wescott Woodlands
    Eagan, MN 55123

    Disabled American Veterans
    651-487-2002
    572 University Ave.
    St. Paul, MN

    Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota
    651-287-2300

    Goodwill
    952-953-4410
    7320 153rd St.
    Apple Valley, MN 55124

    Goodwill
    651-994-7907
    1247 Northwood Parkway
    Eagan, MN 55121

    Goodwill 
    651-451-2014
    1425 S. Robert St.
    West St. Paul, MN 55118

    Hastings Family Service
    651-437-7134
    121 E. Third St.
    Hastings, MN 55033

    Lupus Foundation of Minnesota  
    952-746-5151
    2626 E. 82nd St.
    Suite 135
    Bloomington, MN 55425

    Neighbors, Inc.  
    651-455-1508
    218 13th Ave S.
    South St. Paul, MN 55075

    Salvation Army
    Burnsville Family and Thrift Store
    952-435-7462
    10141 Irving Ave.
    Burnsville, MN 55337

    Vietnam Veterans of America
    651-778-8387

    Savers
    952-432-7263
    7608 W. 150th St. W.
    Apple Valley, MN 55124

    UNIQUE Thrift Store
    952-898-0988
    14308 Burnhaven Drive
    Burnsville, MN 55337

  • Curbside Recycling

    Recycling Bin
    What can go into your recycling bin at home?  New technologies allow more items to be turned into new products, which means you can recycle more than ever!  Get the list specific to your garbage & recycling hauler by clicking your hauler's logo below.

    Click Your Hauler's Logo:

     

         

    Need a list of haulers that are licensed to provide garbage and recycling in your city?  Click on your city for their hauler directory: Apple Valley, BurnsvilleEagan or Lakeville

  • Declutter Your Home

    Feel like you just have too much stuff cluttering up your home?  It's easy to accumulate things, but getting organized might seem like an insurmountable task.  Luckily, you have many resources for getting your unwanted things recycled and disposed of properly.

    Tips:

    • donation boxesSet aside a small amount of time to declutter rather than trying to do a marathon session--to avoid getting overwhelmed.  Try a goal of "spend 15 minutes a day sorting my office closet" or "1 hour a week cleaning the garage."
    • Have three boxes: "Keep" "Donate/Disposal" and "Hold".  The "Hold" box is for things you think you want to get rid of, but you aren't sure.  Put the "Hold" box in a storage space (attic, closet or garage), and after 30 days, anything you haven't removed from the box probably isn't something you're actively using--and can be donated or disposed of.
    • Go digital: photos and home videos can be transferred to a digital format to go on your home computer.  Even things like play bills, ticket stubs and letters can be scanned in.
    • Take photos of collections, then move them on.  Collecting things can be fun, but evaluate if an old collection is taking up too much space. If you still have the collection of teddy bears from your childhood, consider taking a photo of the collection to remember it by, then donating the items for the next generation to enjoy.  Or, keep one of your favorites if you think you'd like to display it. 

    Know where to throw--
    resources for disposing of common unwanted items:

     Appliance recycling

    Appliances
    [must be recycled]

    Battery disposal 

    Batteries, such as alkaline, button, rechargable, or car batteries [disposal]

    Building materials

    Building materials, such as doors, cabinets, bathroom fixtures, flooring, etc [reusable] [no longer usable]

     Carpet recycling

    Carpet [recycle] [disposal]

     Clothing reuse

    Clothing [thrift or consign]

     

    Confidential Documents
    [shredding services]

     

    Christmas Lights [recycle]

    electric household item recycling 

    Electric items, such as vaccuums, toasters, hair dryers, etc [recycle]

     Electronics recycling

    Electronics, such as TVs, VCRs, computers, etc [must be recycled]

     furniture disposal

    Furniture
    [in good condition]
    [no longer usable]

    Household goods 

    Household goods, such as kitchenware, decor, etc [donate]

     HHW disposal

    Household hazardous waste, such as paint, cleaners, automotive fluids, etc [special disposal]

     Mattress recycling

    Mattresses
    [in good condition]
    [no longer usable]

    medication disposal 

    Medication [special drop-off at police stations]

     Recyclables

    Recyclables
    [large quantities for drop-off]

     Scrap metal

    Scrap metal, such as metal weight sets, metal lawn furniture, metal car parts, etc [recycle]

     

    Shoes [reusable] [recycle]

     donation boxes

    Toys [reusable]

      

    For more information, or if you are interested in attending a Decluttering Workshop, call 952-895-4515 or email a DVR staff member 

  • Do you live in an apartment?

    Living in an apartment or multiple-dwelling property may limit your space and your control over your environment in comparison to a single-family home, but there are still easy ways to be green.  This type of living situation comes with some different ways of dealing with waste, recycling, energy, etc.  Check out the information below to help you get on your way.

    Garbage and Recycling

    1. Management companies/landlords of multiple-dwelling properties must offer tenants the opportunity to recycle, per city ordinance in Apple Valley, Burnsville, and Eagan, MN.  See the Ordinances section.  If you are not offered any recycling for the basic materials (cans, bottles, paper, etc.), talk to your management company. 

    2. In the garbage industry, apartment buildings are often considered "commercial" accounts rather than "residential".  If you need to contact the garbage or recycling hauler that services your building(s), please check our list of licensed commercial haulers. 

    3. Did you know you must properly recycle electronics when you are done with them and NOT put them in the garbage?  They also cannot go in with regular recyclables (cans, bottles, paper, etc.).  Find options for recycling electronics like televisions, computers, stereos, etc. at the electronics recycling section.

    4. Need to find out how to recycle other items?  Check out our Residential Recycling section. 

    5. Want to learn how to properly dispose of many different items?  Visit Dakota County's Recycling and Disposal Guide, an online tool with lots of information.

    Energy

    1. Easy things like turning off the lights and unplugging electronics while not in use can help save electricity and money.

    2. Washing clothes in cold water uses less energy and will save you money if you have your own washer.  It will also preserve your clothing.

    3. Use CFLs (compact fluorescent bulbs) in lamps and lighting fixtures instead of the old incandescent bulbs.  Not only will they last longer, but they use 75% less energy.  Just make sure to look for the Energy Star rating on the light bulbs to ensure long-lasting quality.  Learn more about Fluorescent bulbs.

    4. For many other energy-saving tips, check out the MN Energy Challengeand their "Renter" specific section. 

    Moving in or moving out?

    5. Want to find or get rid of gently used furniture and other household goods?  Check out things like Craigslist or look at the Reuse sectionto find donation and other opportunities.

    6. Do you have household cleaners, paint, old fluorescent bulbs or other items that need to be disposed of?  These are considered household hazardous waste and can all be brought to The Dakota County Recycling Zone, in Eagan, at NO CHARGE. 

     

  • Document Shredding

    Paperwork with confidential information should be shredded to prevent the possibility of identity theft.  There are a number of options for residents and businesses to have their paperwork securely shredded.  If you can transport your documents, you may choose to utilize a shredding drop-off location.  If you would prefer to have paperwork shredded at your home or business, you may choose one of the following shredding pick-up services.  Shredding services are subject to fees; call ahead for pricing.

    Drop-Off Locations

    Randy’s Environmental Services (South Location)
    12620 Vincent Ave S
    Burnsville, MN 55337
    763-972-3335
    www.randyssanitation.com
    Pricing per bankers box (about 55 lbs)
    Additional info: documents secured immediately and shredded within 48 hours
    Hours: M-F 8 a.m- 5 p.m, Sat 8 a.m-noon, Sun-closed 

    Veteran Shredding
    1800 Cliff Rd E, Suite #9
    Burnsville, MN 55337
    952-758-2980
    www.veteranshredding.net
    Call for pricing
    Call for appointment

    First Shred
    Drop-off station at UPS Store

    3432 Denmark Ave
    Eagan, MN 55123
    651-687-0440
    www.firstshred.com
    Pricing per pound
    Additional info: limit of 3 bankers boxes
    Call for hours

    Document Destruction
    21225 Hamburg Ave, 

    Lakeville, MN  55044
    952-898-3030
    Pricing per pound
    Call for hours and pricing

    Shred Nations
    Drop-off station at UPS Store
    1670 S Robert St

    West St Paul, MN 55118
    651-204-9174
    www.shrednations.com
    Pricing per pound
    Visit website for hours

    Office Depot/Max locations: 
    7361 153rd St
    Apple Valley, MN 
    952-997-2434

    14121 Alrich Ave. S
    Burnsville, MN
    952-898-3777

    1271 Promenade Place
    Eagan, MN
    651-686-6606

    Pick-up Services

    Veteran Shredding
    952-758-2980
    www.veteranshredding.net
    Call for pricing
    Additional info: on-site shredding
    Call for appointment

    First Shred
    972-241-0153
    www.firstshred.com/residentialservice
    Call for pick-up pricing
    Additional info: see website
    Call for appointment

    Pioneer SecureShred
    612-381-2199
    www.pioneersecureshred.com
    Call for pick-up pricing
    Additional info: On-site and off-site shredding available
    Call for appointment

    Randy's Environmental Services
    Document Destruction Devision
    763-972-3335
    www.randyssanitation.com
    Call for pick-up pricing
    Additional info: On-site and off-site shredding available
    Call for appointment

    Shred Nations
    800-747-3365

    www.shrednations.com
    Call for pick-up pricing
    Additional info: On-site and off-site shredding available
    Call for appointment

  • Electronics

    pile of electronics: tvs, printers, computer equipmentElectronics cannot go in the garbage according to Minnesota State Law. Any item that has a circuit board or a cathode ray tube (CRT) is consided to be an electronic.  This includes:

    • Televisions
    • Computers (central processing units, monitors, laptops)
    • Computer accessories such as keyboards, speakers, printers and other peripherals
    • VCRs, DVD players and Blu-Ray players
    • Gaming consoles
    • Fax Machines
    • Cell phones, mp3 players and other handheld devices

     Some small appliances, such as coffee makers, are consided electronics if they have digital display screen.

    Recycling Electronics

    Option 1: Bring your unwanted electronics to The Recycling Zone, a local electronics recycler or a retail store with an electronics recycling program.

    The Recycling Zone
    3365 Dodd Rd
    Eagan, MN 55121
    651-905-4520
    www.dakotacounty.us (search Recycling Zone)
    Wed: 9:00am - 8:00pm
    Thurs: noon - 8:00pm
    Fri: 9:00am - 5:00pm
    Sat: 8:00am - 5:00pm
    Fee: Most items are free, computer monitors and TVs are $10 each

    Local Electronics Recyclers
    Contact electronics recyclers directly for hours of operation and fees.

    Advanced Recyclers
    8980 S Hwy 149
    Inver Grove Heights, MN 55077
    651-454-9215
    www.jrsappliance.com

    Certified Recycling
    14305 Ewing Ave
    Burnsville, MN 55306
    952-894-1448
    www.certifiedappliance.com

    Materials Processing Corporation
    2300 Pilot Knob Rd
    Mendota Heights, MN
    651-681-8099
    www.materialsprocessing.com

    Plaza TV and Appliance, Inc.
    846 S Robert St
    West Saint Paul, MN 55118
    651-457-1196
    www.plazatv.com

    Veteran Shredding
    1800 Cliff Rd E #9
    Burnsville, MN 55337
    952-758-2980
    www.veteranshredding.net

    Retail Stores with Electronics Recycling Programs
    Contact stores directly for hours and program details.

    Best Buy
    Multiple locations [find a store]
    www.bestbuy.com/recycling
    Limit 3 electronics per household, per day.
    Limit 2 TVs per household, per day. LED screens smaller than 50". Tube TVs smaller than 32" and under. 25$ fee for TVs and monitors. Visit Best Buy website for restrictions and items accepted.

    Staples
    Multiple locations [find a store]
    Staples Eco-services webpage
    Limit 3 electronics per person, per day.
    Visit Staples website for items accepted and restrictions.

    Target
    Multiple locations [find a store]
    Recycle handheld devices such as mp3 players and cell phones at recycling station at front of store.
    Devices such as GPS, tablet PCs and gaming consoles can be traded in for a Target gift card through target.nextworth.com
    Contact store directly for details.

    Recycling for Raptors
    Multiple locations [find a store]
    Recycling used inkjet printer cartridges only. 
    Contact the U of M Raptor Center directly for details.

    Option 2: If you do not have a way to transport an electronic item to a recycling facility, call your garbage hauler or one of the local electronics recyclers above to schedule a pick-up for a one-time fee.  The Recycling Zone does not arrange pick ups of electronic items.

  • Environmental Purchasing Logos

    Energy Star logo

    ENERGY STARis a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy helping us all save money and protect the environment through energy efficient products and practices.
     

     

    EPEAT logoEPEAT, which stands for Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool, is an easy-to-use, on-line tool helping institutional purchasers select and compare computer desktops, laptops and monitors based on their environmental attributes. As of June 2007, approximately 532 products manufactured by 19 manufacturers were EPEAT registered and listed on the EPEAT Product Registry Web page.
     


    Three good reasons to purchase Energy Star and EPEAT products:

    • It reduces greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy.  Also improvements in equipment operation and end-of-life management practices.
    • It makes it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort.
    • It provides clear, consistent procurement criteria so that consumers can promote environmental stewardship with their dollars.  Every time someone buys a product that’s a part of the EPEAT or Energy Star program, they’re helping give manufacturers an incentive to produce greener electronics that are less harmful to the environment.

     Check out the EPA web sitefor more information about EPEAT.

  • Examples of Household Hazardous Waste

    The following are examples of common household hazardous waste items that require special disposal.  Everything listed here can be taken to The Recycling Zone.

    Automotive:

    • Auto batteries
    • Antifreeze
    • Oils/Filters
    • Tires

    Lawn and Garden:

    • Fertilizers
    • Ligher Fluid
    • Pesticides
    • Pool chemicals

    Household Items:

    • Aerosol cans
    • Batteries (non-alkaline)
    • Cleaners
    • Fluorescent bulbs
    • Furniture polish
    • Needles/syringes/lancets
    • Nail polish
    • Propane/compressed gas cylinders

    Home Improvement:

    • Driveway sealer
    • Paint
    • Paint remover/stripper/thinner
    • Solvents

     

  • Fluorescent bulbs

    CFL BulbsCompact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) use significantly less energy than traditional (incandescent) light bulbs.  If every America home replaced one bulb with a CFL, we'd save enough energy to light 3 million homes, and prevent greenhouse gas emissions equal to ~800,000 cars.  Even though CFLs contain a small amount of mercury, that amount is significantly less than the amount of mercury avoided as a result of the energy savings.

    Recycling and Disposal of CFLs:

    • CFL bulbs: It is illegal to place CFL bulbs in the garbage, because they contain a small amount of mercury.  You can recycle CFL bulbs for free to any of the locations in the green box below. NOTE: if you have fluorescent tubes, please scroll down to the next bulletpoint for free and for-a-fee options.

    The Recycling Zone
    3365 Dodd Road
    Eagan, MN 55121
    651-905-4520
    W 3pm-8pm, Th 12pm-5pm,
    Sa 9am-2pm
    website

    Eagan Community Center
    1501 Central Parkway
    Eagan, MN 55121
    651-675-5550
    M-F 5:45am-9:45pm
    Sa 8am-8pm, Su 10am-8pm
    website

    Eagan City Hall
    3830 Pilot Knob Rd
    Eagan, MN 55122
    651-675-5011
    M-F 8am-4:30pm

    City of Burnsville Maint. Center
    13713 Frontier Court
    Burnsville, MN 55337
    952-895-4511
    M-F 7am-3:30pm

    City of Apple Valley Maint. Facility
    6442 140th St W
    Apple Valley, MN 55124
    952-953-2400
    M-F 8am-4:30pm

    IKEA
    8000 Ikea Way
    Bloomington, MN 55425
    888-888-4532
    M-Th 10am-8pm, F-Sa 10am-9pm,
    Su 10am-7pm
    website

    Home Depot
    Multiple locations
    Home Depot store locator
    Menards
    Multiple locations
    Menards store locator
    Ace Hardware
    Multiple locations
    Ace store locator
    True Value
    Multiple locations
    True Value store locator

     

    Learn more about recycling CFLs:

    httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zumxlRR-WYE

    Why use a CFL?

    • A CFL can save more than $40 in electricity costs over its lifetime if used instead of an incandescent bulb.
    • It uses 75% less energy than standard incandescent bulbs and lasts 10 times longer.
    • Produces about 75% less heat, so it's safer to operate and can cut energy costs associated with home cooling.

    Preventing CFLs from Breaking:

    • Always switch off and allow the bulb to cool before handling.  If possible, screw/unscrew the CFL by holding the plastic or ceramic base, not the glass tubing.
    • Do not overtighten.
    • Keep out of lamps that could easily tip, especially in rooms often used by children or pregnant women.

    Cleaning Up a Broken CFL:

    • Exposure to broken CFLs can pose a health risk, especially to a fetus or young child.
    1. Open a window, shut off central air conditioning or forced-air heating, and clear the room for at least 15 minutes, as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends.
    2. Follow the detailed cleanup steps for either hard surfaces or carpeting/rugs posted on the EPA web site.

    Check out these other helpful links:

  • Food Waste Programs

    Businesses that generate food waste have options for disposing of this waste other than sending it to the landfill.  Starting an organics recycling program is a viable option for giving your food waste another purpose, and being an environmental steward. 

    There are three main organics recycling options for businesses:

    Food-to-People Programs-- Sometimes food being thrown away is edible and fine for human consumption.  This waste material can serve as a resource for food rescue organizations and can provide hunger relief for those in need in the community. This includes donating fresh or prepared food that is still good such as day-old bread or that day's leftovers. For more information visit Rethink Recycling's Food Recovery Guide. 

    Food-to-Livestock Programs-- Food that is no longer safe for people to eat can still find a good use.  Food waste can be taken by a farmer to be processed into animal feed.  This includes any amount of food scraps and by-products. For more information check out Rethink Recycling's Guide and search Food to Animals. 

    Organics Composting-- Food scraps and soiled paper can be collected and taken to a compost facility where it is composted and turned into a nutrient rich soil amendment. Call your hauler for organics recycling options and check out the local SET compost site in Dakota County.

  • Furniture

    Furniture in good condition can be donated to any of the following businesses to be resold and reused.  For furniture items no longer in good condition, call your garbage hauler for a one-time pick up (call for fees), or bring them to a landfill.

    Apple Valley

    Goodwill
    7320 153rd St
    Apple Valley, MN 55124
    952-953-4410

    Savers
    7608 W 150th St
    Apple Valley, MN 55124
    952-432-7263

    Burnsville

    C.H.A.P. Thrift Store
    2020 E Hwy 13
    Burnsville, MN 55337
    952-890-8222

    stack of furnitureSalvation Army - Burnsville Family and Thrift Store
    10141 Irving Ave
    Burnsville, MN 55337
    952-435-7462

    UNIQUE Thrift Store
    14308 Burnhaven Dr
    Burnsville, MN 55337
    952-898-0988

    Eagan

    Goodwill
    1247 Northwood Pkwy
    Eagan, MN 55121
    651-994-7907

    Other Dakota County Locations

    Goodwill
    1425 S Robert St
    West Saint Paul, MN 55118
    651-451-2014

  • Garden Pots

    For the avid gardener, spring and summer means the accumulation of those black plastic garden pots.  Plastic pots take up space in landfills; they do not readily decompose and remain intact for many years. 

    Lowe's home improvement stores provide a drop-off garden pot recycling program for customers.  No matter where you purchase the plant, you can return the materials to a Lowe's Garden Center to be recycled.  Learn more on the Lowe's website.black plastic garden pots

    Lowe's--West St. Paul
    1795 Robert St.
    West St. Paul, MN 55118
    763-367-4139

    Lowe's--Shakopee
    4270 Dean Lakes Blvd.
    Shakopee, MN 55379
    952-367-9000

    Additionally, some garbage haulers now accept black plastic garden pots with your curbside recycling.  If you have one of the following haulers, keep plastic from the landfills by recycling your plastic pots, trays and hanging baskets in your recycling cart.  Just clean the pots of dirt before putting them with your recycling.

    • Nitti Sanitation
    • Highland Sanitation
    • GarbageMan of Burnsville
    • Waste Management
    • Dick's Sanitation/Lakeville Sanitary
    • Aspen Waste Systems

    For more information about specific recycling guidelines, check out what your garbage hauler accepts.

     

  • Get More Room to Recycle

    Do you run out of room in your recycling cart at home before your recycling day? You're not alone--due to the fact that more of your waste is recyclable than ever before, some families find that their recycling cart is overflowing on a regular basis.  Luckily, there are easy steps you can take to ease those recycling woes.

     Overflowing recycling cart

    Most garbage companies will automatically give you a 65 gallon recycling cart, which gets picked up every other week. If that system doesn't work for your household, try the following:

    Upgrade your bin to a bigger size

    • Call your hauler and ask to upgrade to a 95 gallon recycling cart. Most companies will switch out the bin at either no charge or for a one-time "bin-switch" fee.  Please inquire about fees directly with your hauler, as it will depend on your location and if you're in a townhome, homeowners association, or single-family home. (Don't know your hauler's number? Click here for a directory)

     Add a bin

    • Still not enough room? Consider asking for a 2nd recycling cart. Some haulers may provide this for free, other may charge a small monthly fee.
    • If you live in Burnsville or Apple Valley, there are garbage companies that may provide weekly recycling service. Call the City recycling department at 952-895-4511 for more information.

    If you are recycling more, you may also be able to downsize your garbage service. By law, garbage haulers are required to charge less for a smaller-sized garbage cart. You could save $1 to $3 per month, not to mention space in your garage!

    don't crush plastic containers

    Did You Know?

    When your recycling cart is overflowing, it may be tempting to squish all the recyclables down to make them fit. However, this can be trouble down the line. The machines at the recycling facility sort recyclables based on their dimensions--cans and bottles are three-dimensional (3D) and paper and cardboard are two-dimensional (2D). So, DON'T flatten pop cans or plastic containers, but DO flatten your cardboard boxes. See a video about the process of sorting materials at a recycling facility.

  • Green Cleaners

    Green CleaningAccording to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), of the more than 75,000 registered chemicals, only a fraction has been tested for human health effects.  Improper use and disposal of these chemicals can have a negative effect on our health and the environment.  In the US, we generate 1.6 million tons of harmful household chemicals. The average home can accumulate as much as 300 pounds of household hazardous waste. Check out these tips for reducing the chemicals in your home and for saving money too.

    Green Cleaning Tips

    Read Labels. Reading labels can tell you a lot about the product and its possible health effects.  Watch for signal words like caution, warning, danger, poison, flammable, corrosive, & toxic.

    Use Cleaners Safely.Do not mix cleaners.  Use cleaners for their intended purpose.   Always test a formula first.  Wear gloves while using cleaners. Never mix chlorine with any cleaning agent.

    Dispose of Houshold Hazardous Waste Properly. Keep household hazardous waste out of drains, storm sewers, trash containers, and off of the ground.  Bring it to The Recycling Zone.

    All-Purpose Cleaner Recipes

    Option 1
    4 tablespoons baking soda
    1 quart warm water
    Dissolve baking soda in water. Apply with sponge. Wipe clean.

    Option 2
    1 teaspoon liquid dish soap
    1 quart warm water
    A squeeze of lemon
    Combine ingredients in a small bucket.
    Apply with a sponge or rag. Wipe clean.

    Option 3
    1/8 cup washing soda (or Borax)
    1 tablespoon liquid dish soap
    1/4 cup vinegar
    2 gallons hot water
    Mix ingredients in a pail or bottle.
    Apply with cloth or in spray bottle. Wipe clean. (Apply to floors with a mop.)

    For more recipes, visit the Dakota County webpage on green cleaning recipes.

Contact Us

City Education Department
13713 Frontier Court
Burnsville, MN 55337-3817
Phone: 952-895-4559

Dakota Valley Recycling

DVR is the partnership recycling department for the Cities of Apple Valley, BurnsvilleEagan and Lakeville that connects residents and businesses to recycling, composting and waste disposal information.

DVR is not a drop off facility and does not accept any materials for recycling.