Residential Guide

  • Sidewalk Salt

    For years, doctors have told people to stick to a low-salt diet.  According to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), our waters should follow the same advice.icy sidewalk in the winter

    When snow and ice start to accumulate on Minnesota roads, parking lots, and sidewalks, one of the more common reactions is to apply salt, which contains chloride--a water pollutant.  When snow and ice melt, most of the salt goes with it, washing into our lakes, streams and rivers.  Once in the water, there’s no way to remove the chloride, and it becomes a pollutant.

    According to Brooke Asleson, MPCA project manager for the Twin Cities Metro Area Chloride Project, “salt is a real threat to water quality.  It only takes one teaspoon of road salt to permanently pollute five gallons of water.  We are trying to spread the word that less is more when it comes to applying salt because at high concentrations, chloride can harm the fish and plant life in our waters.”

    Check out the MPCA's video on winter sidewalk and driveway maintenance, with tips on types of salt, when to use it and how much to use:

    Here are some ways for homeowners to reduce salt use while still making sure your sidewalk and driveway is safe:

    • Shovel.  The more snow and ice you remove manually, the less salt you will have to use and the more effective it can be.  Break up ice with an ice scraper and decide if application of a de-icer or sand is even necessary to maintain traction.
    • More salt does not mean more melting.  Use less than four pounds of salt per 1,000 square feet (an average parking space is about 150 square feet).  One pound of salt is approximately a heaping 12-ounce coffee mug.
    • 15 degrees is too cold for salt to work.  Most salts stop working around this temperature.  Instead, use sand for traction.
    • Sweep up extra salt.  If salt or sand is visible on dry pavement, it is no longer doing any work and will be washed away.

    To learn more about what you can to reduce chloride in our waters, visit the agency’s Twin Cities Metro Area Chloride Project webpage.

  • The Recycling Zone

    The Recycling Zone is the County-run recycling center in Eagan, MN. This facility is where all Dakota County residents can bring recyclables, electronics, scrap metal, paint, household chemicals, hazardous waste and other items that shouldn't go in the trash. The Recycling Zone is open to all residents living in Dakota County or the other metro-area counties. A full list of accepted items and more information about available programs can be found on the Dakota County Recycling Zone website.

    Businesses can only dispose of their hazardous waste at The Recycling Zone through the Very Small Quantity Generator Program. Visit Dakota County's For Businesses page for more information and to schedule an appointment

    Location

    3365 Dodd Road (South Highway 149)
    Eagan, MN 55121
    651-905-4520

    Hours:
    Wednesday: 9:00am - 8:00pm
    Thursday: noon - 8:00pm
    Friday: 9:00am - 5:00pm
    Saturday: 8:00am - 5:00pm

    *The Recycling Zone is closed New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

    Acceptable Items From Residents (free unless otherwise noted)

    • Household hazardous waste such as paint, automotive oil, chemicals, cleaners and fertilizers
    • Ammunition (Please do NOT bring ammunition to your local Police Department)
    • Electronics such as laptops, stereos, DVD players, satellite dishes, and cell phones (Computer monitors and TV's have a $10 per-item drop-off fee)
    • Small household electronics such as toasters, vacuums, radios and coffee makers
    • Scrap metal
    • Tires (Fees starting at $5)
    • Basic recyclables: aluminum cans, cardboard boxes, glass, and plastic bottles 
    • More recyclable plastics: yogurt, pudding and fruit cups, plastic disposable drinking cups, margarine, cream cheese and cottage cheese tubs, and deli containers
    • Recyclable paper cartons: milk cartons, juice cartons, juice boxes, and broth/soup cartons.

    Not Accepted

    Other Services

    • Reuse Zone: Residents can also pick up free products from The Reuse Zone. When items are brought in and are still usable, The Recycling Zone puts them out for reuse. Items in The Reuse Zone include paint, chemicals, cleaners, solvents, etc. 
    • Lead Sinker Exchange: Exchange your lead sinkers for non-hazardous alternatives, free of charge.
    • Thermometer Exchange: Exchange your old mercury thermometers for non-hazardous alternatives, free of charge.

  • Top 10 In The Bin

    If you have ever caught yourself asking "can I recycle this?" -you're not alone. New technologies in recycling allow for more materials to go into the recycling bin, but it also makes recycling a little confusing. To help answer the question- "can I recycle this?"- three national organizations teamed up to unify and simplify the recycling message by creating the program "Top 10 in the Bin." These organizations include Keep America Beautiful, the National Waste and Recycling Association, and the Solid Waste Association of North America. To see a more detailed recycling list that is specific to your hauler in Dakota County, visit our curbside recycling guide here

    To download the Top 10 In The Bin poster for free visit americarecyclesday.org 

     

  • Vermicomposting

    worms for vermicompostingVermicomposting is the process of using worms to turn kitchen waste into a black, earthy-smelling, nutrient-rich humus.

    You Need 5 Basic Ingredients to Start Vermicomposting:

    1. A Container. Worm boxes can be purchased or made. Plastic storage containers are convenient and come in a variety of sizes. These containers are easily transported.  Never snap the lid shut tight. The lid should lie loosely on the bin.
    2. Bedding.Use shredded corrugated cardboard, shredded paper like newspaper, or commercial worm bedding which is available in sporting goods stores, but it is also more expensive.
    3. Water. Place the dry, shredded bedding in a large container and add water until it covers the bedding.  Squeeze the water out from the bedding as much as possible. Place the bedding in the bin and fluff. Your bedding needs to remain moist.  Mist if necessary.
    4. Worms. The worms used in vermicomposting are called redworms (Eisenia foetida).  You can order them through lawn and garden catalogs.  Keep the temperature between 55 and 77 degrees Fahrenheit.
    5. Non-Fatty Kitchen Scraps. Add vegetable & fruit waste, coffee grounds, egg shells, and tea bags.  Start slowly.  Gradually increase the amount of food.  Pull back a small amount of bedding and dump in the scraps. Cover the scraps with bedding.

    The worms will digest the kitchen scraps and bedding faster than any other compost method, passing through the worms' bodies and becoming "castings." In about 3-4 months, the worms will have digested nearly all the garbage and bedding.  The bin will be filled with a rich, black natural fertilizer. Worm castings contain five times more nitrogen, seven times more phosphorus and 11 times more potassium than soil. Remove the castings from time to time.

    For more information go to www.wormlady.com.

Contact Us

City Education Department
13713 Frontier Court
Burnsville, MN 55337-3817
Phone: 952-895-4559

Dakota Valley Recycling

DVR is the partnership recycling department for the Cities of Apple Valley, BurnsvilleEagan and Lakeville that connects residents and businesses to recycling, composting and waste disposal information.

DVR is not a drop off facility and does not accept any materials for recycling.