Latest News

  • 2016 Business Recycling Law

    Recycle Keyboard

    New Recycling Requirement for Businesses

    Starting January 1, 2016, recycling will be the law for many businesses. Commercial building owners operating or leasing to a retail establishment, restaurant, educational or professional service, health care service or any other business with a North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) code between 42 and 81 and contracting disposal of at least four cubic yards of solid waste per week must recycle at least three materials, such as paper, glass, plastic, metal and organics (food waste and soiled paper). 

  • 5 Tips to Green in the New Year

    The New Year is a time for resolutions that are made to bring about positive changes in your life. This year, make a difference in your community and start off the New Year right by adding some easy green resolutions to your list. Here are five ideas to help you get started:  scraping plate of food

    1. Reduce your food waste: 40% of food is currently being wasted in the United States. That means wasted resources, time, energy, and money. Reducing your food waste might be as easy as making smaller trips to the store with a clear list in mind, or just storing your food properly to make it last as long as possible. For more tips, visit our Reduce Your Food Waste Guide. 

    2. Reuse wfix-it clinic bannerith ease: Why buy something new when you can fix something you have for free? This year, resolve to attend a Dakota County Fix-It Clinic when you have something in need of repair. Clinics are offered every month in cities around Dakota County and you can bring up to five small household items such as torn clothing, broken vacuum cleaners, and more. 

    3. Recycle everything you can: This year, recycle more by using the hauler specific recycling guides found here. While you’re at it, make sure to recycle the things that can’t go in your curbside bin such as electronics by taking them to the Recycling Zone!

    4. Ditch the plastic: Approximately 50% of the plastic we use, we use once then throw away. Make 2018 the year you make a conscious effort to bring a reusable bag shopping and a reusable water bottle whenever possible. 

    5. Recycle your organics: Orgafood scrapsnic material such as food scraps and food-soiled paper don't have to end up in the landfill. Instead turn them into a rich soil  amendment by recycling them. Dakota County now has two free drop sites for your household organics. You can also resolve to backyard compost this year too! Find out how using our Backyard Composting Guide here

     

  • Ames Center Now Recycles Organics

    three stream recycling container

    The Burnsville Ames Center continues to "wow the crowds" with its newest venture: organics recycling. Guests at the Ames Center may notice the new, brightly colored bins around the venue that feature traditional recycling, trash, and a special spot just for organic waste.

    To make recycling easier, the new containers have labels showing what can be thrown where, and most of the items in the concession/bar have been switched to BPI-Certified compostable alternatives. While bottles, cans and paper handouts can continue to go in the regular blue recycling bin, things such as cups, plastic forks, napkins, apple cores, and most food containers can go into the green organics bin. Other items such as candy wrappers or chip bags should still go in the trash.

    Many of these new BPI-Certified compostable items are made of a plant based plastic and look like they could go in the recycling bin. However, in order for them to be turned into compost, they will need to go in the green bin with other compostable items. If you are unsure if the item you purchased is compostable, check the item for the BPI Logo or just ask any staff member at the Ames Center. 

    Organics recycling plays an essential role in keeping valuable materials out of landfills. Organics collected at the Ames Center will be brought to a local organics recycling facility to be turned into compost, a valuable soil additive. Compost improves soil quality, reduces erosion, reduces greenhouse gases, and decreases the need for chemical fertilizers. 

    So, next time you’re at the Ames Center, grab an ice cold refreshment and make to sure throw the whole cup in the green bin when you’re done- straw too!

  • Ask a DVR Staff


    Got a question about recycling? Not sure how to dispose of a household item?  Need information about yard waste sites, landfills, or The Recycling Zone?

    If your question isn't covered by the content on this website, contact us directly via email or call us at 952-895-4559. 

  • Camp Sustainably

    Camping and hiking are fantastic ways to adventure into and experience nature. Doing so in the summer lets us see plants and animals that don’t stick around in the winter. Although, sometimes we get so excited, we forget to plan accordingly and sustainably. It’s important to do this so that we can ensure nature remains if we want to keep exploring! Before you go out, take a look at these tips and tricks for camping in an environmentally friendly way. 

    1. Borrow gear and go reusable: To begin your trip, do what you can to buy used gear or borrow from friends. Not only will this save you money, but it's also Reusable platesvery eco-friendly. There's no need to invest in expensive equipment if you won't use it regularly. Reusable napkins, dishware, and silverware are essential, as is earth-friendly soap to wash them. Lastly, don't forget to pack all your food in a reusable container so that you aren't producing waste once you've eaten.

     2. Use non-toxic: No one likes to sport a sunburn or endure thick clouds of bugs, so you'll likely be bringing sunscreen and bug spray. When you do, keep in mind the flora and fauna around you that don't need that protection- bring non-toxic! Not only will the air, greenery, and animal life thank you for caring, but you'll also save yourself from breathing in harsh chemicals. 

    3. Pack it in, pack it out: Bring something to bring all of your waste in, or pack so that you don't generate waste. Cook with a portable portable camping stovestove so that you keep from impacting the ground with ash and burns from a fire. Campfires leave evidence of humans having been there and remember, you're the guest. If you do build a campfire, utilize the wood found on the ground or on your site- don't bring wood in to prevent the spread of invasive species. 

     4. Stay on the trail: Hiking is a great way to experience the naturally formed infrastructure around us, but remember we are visitors. Stay on the trail as you explore to prevent erosion and disruption of habitats of those who live there, plants and animals alike. Refrain from picking flowers and leave the rocks and logs alone. 

    5. Sleep sustainably: In your search of the perfect spot to lay your camp, keep in mind the softness of the ground. The softer it is, the more likely you are to Campers on rockprovoke erosion in that area. This means going for gravel, solidly packed dirt, or even a slab of rock. Choose a spot that is designated for camping by the forest or park you're in- there's no need to make a new campsite if one already exits. By being conscious of where you sleep, you'll minimize your footprint as well as any damage to the area.

     6. Skip the gadgets: For your own enjoyment and to fully experience what's out there, keep your gadgets at home. Watch the stars and listen to the sounds at night instead of bringing a laptop or portable dvd player. Bring a map instead of a cell phone or use your cell phone sparingly to keep from staring at a screen. Do all that you can to fully immerse yourself in the experience and joys of camping! 

  • County Solid Waste Master Plan

    Waste Less Banner

    Dakota County is currently revising its 2012-2030 Solid Waste Master Plan to properly manage trash, recyclables, food waste, and hazardous materials for 2017-2037. Dakota Valley Recycling is a part of this important effort that affects everyone in the County including residents, businesses, schools, organizations, haulers, and waste facilities. 

    First Round Complete

    Over 500 County residents and businesses provided input on key issues from November 2016 through February 2017. Take a look at the Round 1 results, which will shape the County’s draft waste management strategies. Curious about the project timeline? Check out the project overview here. 

    Your Voice Matters

    Later this spring, watch for Round 2 opportunities to provide your feedback on those draft strategies, and get more information on the Master Plan process on the County Solid Waste Master Plan website. Dakota County is using the County's Planning Commission as the advisory committee to periodically review recommendations. For more information refer to the Planning Commission's meeting minutes. 

     

  • Fix-it Clinics Coming Up in Dakota County

    Fix It Clinic Banner

    Have a broken item at home gathering dust? Come to a fix-it clinic where residents can bring up to 5 small items to be repaired or mended. Bring in small household electronics, clothing and more and receive free guided assistance to fix your items. Common items include coffee pots, fans, jewelry, and clothes with tears or holes.

    Saturday, January 13th
    Noon-3pm
    Inver Glen Library, Inver Grove Heights

    Saturday, February 17th
    Noon-3pm
    Burnhaven Library, Burnsville 

    Saturday, March 17th
    Noon-3pm
    Heritage Library, Lakeville

    Saturday, April 21st
    Noon-3pm
    Farmington Library, Farmington

    Saturday, May 19th
    Noon-3pm
    Pleasant Hill Library, Hastings

    Volunteers Needed
    Want to share your skills with others looking to learn how to repair their items? Volunteer!
    For more information or to sign up, send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 612-867-6524.

  • Green Your Holidays

    Did you know that the volume of trash generally increases by 25% between Thanksgiving and New Years? Help reduce that waste with some easy reducing and recycling holiday tips. 

  • How to Recycle Aluminum Foil and Trays

    Did you know that aluminum foil and trays are 100% recyclable? In fact, they are just as recyclable as aluminum cans! The problem is, not all recycling centers accept foil and trays due to the fact that they often contain food waste which can contaminate collection. This leads to a reusable material ending up in a landfill where it takes about 400 years to break down.

  • How To Recycle Batteries

    From lithium ion to alkaline to zinc-carbon, there are many different types of batteries that you may encounter every day in your home. But do you know what to do with them?

    In many cases, you are able to bring your batteries directly back to the retailer. In Dakota County this includes but is not limited to: Target, Walmart, Home Depot, all car parts stores, Best Buy, RadioShack, Sams Club, Staples, Batteries Plus, and Lowe's. 

    Lithium Ion  Lithium Ion Battery

    Also known as a rechargeable battery, these batteries have become extremely common due to their convenience and cost savings. However, they do contain hazardous materials and are illegal to dispose of in your household garbage bin. Instead, place tape over the terminals and bring them to a retailer or the recycling zone to dispose of them for free.

    Alkaline Alkaline Battery

    Alkaline batteries are another very common household battery and come in many shapes, colors and sizes. Perhaps the common is the gold and black battery with the word “alkaline” written somewhere on the battery. These types of batteries can be disposed of in your household garbage bin, BUT they do contain valuable materials so it is better to bring them to The Recycling Zone to be recycled. These batteries are not accepted in your curbside recycling bin because they are too small and often get lost in the process or fall through the cracks in the materials recycling facility. When it comes to batteries, if in doubt- bring it to The Recycling Zone.

    Car Batteries    Car Battery

    Automotive batteries, also commonly referred to as lead-acid batteries, are large square lead blocks. These batteries are a type of lithium ion batteries and are illegal to dispose of in your household garbage bin. Instead, you can recycle them at your local automotive store, or take them to The Recycling Zone in Dakota County. 

    Nickel-Cadmium Batteries      Nickel Cadmium Battery

    Nickel-cadmium batteries are another type of rechargeable battery that uses nickel oxide hydroxide and metallic cadmium instead of lithium. These batteries are also illegal to throw away in your household garbage and must be disposed of responsibly either through a retail store or by bringing them into The Recycling Zone.   

    The Recycling Zone

    3365 Dodd Road (South Highway 149)
    Eagan, MN 55121
    651-905-4520

    For more information about materials accepted and hours, visit our Recycling Zone guide. 

    Battery Handling Tips

    • Store batteries in a vented plastic bucket or sturdy cardboard box away from light bulbs and other breakable items
    • Tape the terminals with electrical or plastic tape to prevent short circuiting
    • Older batteries may rust and leak. If a battery appears to be dirty or have a film around the terminals, use caution and do not touch the areas leaking. 
    • Always wash your hands after handling batteries or use gloves to prevent touching hazardous materials

     

  • How To Recycle Plastic Bags

    Most plastic bags are made with materials that are recyclable, unfortunately this doesn’t mean they can go into your curbside bin. This includes grocery store plastic bags, zip lock bags, newspaper cover slips, bread loaf bags, and anything similar. Why? Because due to their size and shape, they end up clogging machines at recycling facilities. It just takes one bag to get caught and bring the entire operation to a halt, requiring an employee to remove the bag by hand; a time consuming, and possibly dangerous task. 

    So what do you do with them?

    Most retail and grocery stores offer free plastic bag drop-off bins for guests to use. Just take them there on your next trip! All you need to do is make sure it’s clean and remove any rigid parts including zippers, firm handles, and/or string ties. And of course, always try to reduce first by only taking plastic bags if you really need them.

    Plastic Bag Recycling

    Stores that offer plastic bag recycling at all locations

    Cub Foods, Target, Whole foods, Walmart (super-centers), Rainbow Foods

    *Some locations of Lunds & Byerlys, JCPenny’s, and Lowe’s also offer plastic bag recycling

    Check out Recycling Association of Minnesota's It's in the Bag program here for more locations or to find the nearest location. 

    Frequently Asked Questions

    What if I put my recyclables in a plastic bag to prevent machines from clogging-can it be recycled then?

    Unfortunately no, the first step at many of these facilities is to sort the recyclables from any waste that might have found its way into the stream. If a recycling facility member sees a tied plastic bag, they most likely will assume its trash and throw it away.

    What kind of plastic bags can’t go in curbside-is it just plastic grocery bags?

    NO plastic bags (zip lock, grocery, film, newspaper slips, etc.) should go in curbside recycling. Take them to a retail location instead.

    Do all recycling/trash companies have the same rules?

    No, they do not. Some will accept things that others will not however, there are currently no haulers that accept plastic bags through curbside collection. Check out our curbside guide to see what your hauler collects!

  • Lakeville joins Dakota Valley Recycling!

    Dakota Valley Recycling (DVR) is excited to announce the addition of Lakeville to their multi-city recycling department. Lakeville joined the cities of Apple Valley, Burnsville and Eagan on Jan. 1, 2017.

    DVR will now provide recycling, composting and waste disposal information to residents and businesses in Lakeville in addition to the work that will continue in Apple Valley, Burnsville, and Eagan. DVR will also help coordinate a number of annual events including the Lakeville Household Hazardous Waste event in the spring.

     

  • Latest News

    January 17
    The recycling world is not immune to myths but don't let these rumors stop you from making a difference. We have compiled the biggest fibs and explained how they just aren't true. {slider Myth 1:...
    January 04
    The New Year is a time for resolutions that are made to bring about positive changes in your life. This year, make a difference in your community and start off the New Year right by adding some easy...
    December 06
    Yo u may have seen new bins around your community featuring signs that say "organics only," but what does that mean? Organics recycling is the recycling of organic material - anything that was once...
    November 27
    This years' annual shoe recycling event has come and gone but with it came a new recycling record! In just one week with the help of Dakota County residents and the local textile recyclers,...
    November 14
    Did you know that the volume of trash generally increases by 25% between Thanksgiving and New Years? Help reduce that waste with some easy reducing and recycling holiday tips.
    November 08
    If you have ever caught yourself asking "can I recycle this?" -you're not alone. New technologies in recycling allow for more materials to go into the recycling bin, but it also makes recycling a...
    October 02
    This year's Household Hazardous Waste Drop-Off Day has come and gone, but you have options for properly disposing of hazardous waste, electronics, and appliances year-round. Household Hazardous...
    September 26
    The Burnsville Ames Center continues to "wow the crowds" with its newest venture: organics recycling. Guests at the Ames Center may notice the new, brightly colored bins around the venue that...
    September 14
    Dakota County has opened a new organics drop-site at Holland Lake Trailhead in Lebanon Hills. The drop site opened on November 3rd, 2017 and all Dakota County residents are welcome to sign up and...
    August 11
    Camping and hiking are fantastic ways to adventure into and experience nature. Doing so in the summer lets us see plants and animals that don’t stick around in the winter. Although, sometimes we get...
    July 13
    From lithium ion to alkaline to zinc-carbon, there are many different types of batteries that you may encounter every day in your home. But do you know what to do with them? In many cases, you are...
    June 06
    Cascade Bay Waterpark includes many fun-filled activities, making it a popular summer destination, and now there’s one more thing to get excited about – recycling! This year, Cascade Bay is...
    May 04
    Monofilament is a common type of fishing line made out of strong, yet flexible plastic, that is usually clear or slightly tinted. The line is not biodegradable and can cause devastating problems to...
    March 17
    Dakota County is currently revising its 2012-2030 Solid Waste Master Plan to properly manage trash, recyclables, food waste, and hazardous materials for 2017-2037. Dakota Valley Recycling is a part...
    January 23
    According the National Resource Defense Council , the average American tosses 25% of the food they buy. That's like going to the grocery store, buying four bags of food, and leaving one in the...

  • Live Greenery Disposal

    row of Christmas trees

    Once you've cleaned up for the holiday season, there are a number of ways to dispose of live greenery, such as trees, garlands and wreaths.

  • Missed the Drop-Off Day? Other Options for Your Stuff

    This year's Household Hazardous Waste Drop-Off Day has come and gone, but you have options for properly disposing of hazardous waste, electronics, and appliances year-round.

    Household Hazardous Wastesuch as aerosols, auto batteries, cleaners, fire extinguishers, fluorescent bulbs/tubes, gasoline, lawn chemicals, paint, pesticides, propane cylinders, rechargeable batteries, thermostats, used oil/filters, and most products labeled dangerous, corrosive, flammable, poison, or combustible.    household hazardous waste

    Electronicssuch as televisions, VCRs, DVD players, computers, computer monitors, printers, computer accessories, stereos, digital cameras, fax equipment, electronic gaming systems, cell phones and other miscellaneous electronic devices. TV's and computer monitors will be $10 each to recycle. bike and lawn mower

    Misc. Electric Household Itemssuch as vaccuum cleaners, carpet sweepers, coffee makers, blenders (without glass), mixers, bread makers, fryers, food sealing equipment, electric knives, clothes irons, shaving  equipment, hair dryers, VHS tapes, holiday lights, space heaters, radios, clocks, telephones, fans, cameras, toaster ovens, microwaves and misc. electric tools (drills, sanders, etc).  Batteries must be removed from all devices.

    stoveAppliancessuch as air conditioners, clothes washers, clothes dryers, hot water heaters, water softeners, garbage disposals, microwaves, trash compactors, stoves/ovens, furnaces, heat pumps, refrigerators, freezers, dehumidifiers and dishwashers.

    Scrap Metalsuch as lawn mowers, snow blowers and power tools (fluids MUST be drained), bicycles, metal grills (separate propane tank for HHW disposal) metal lawn furniture and other scrap metal items.

    Other Items:

    Carpet: for disposal of carpet and carpet padding, click here.

    Furniture: for reuse options of furniture in good condition, click here.  For disposal options, click here.

    Mattresses: for reuse or recycling options for mattresses, click here

    Ammonia-gas appliances (such as RV appliances): ammonia-powered appliances can be brought to JR's Advanced Recycling for a fee. For more information, click here.

    Still have questions about how to get rid of your unwanted stuff?  Call the recycling department at 952-895-4559 or send us an email

  • New Fee to Recycle TVs and Monitors

    Starting August 1, Dakota County will charge a $10 fee to collect and recycle all types of televisions and computer monitors at The Recycling Zone. Residents will be able to pay with cash, check, Visa, or MasterCard.  

  • Organics Drop-Site Now Open in Lebanon Hills

    Dakota County has opened a new organics drop-site at Holland Lake Trailhead in Lebanon Hills. The drop site opened on November 3rd, 2017 and all Dakota County residents are welcome to sign up and participate in the program for free. For more information about the organics recycling program, go to www.co.dakota.mn.us and search organics drop off. 

    How to Participate

    1. Sign Up

    Call 952-891-7557 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    You'll receive a welcome kit with a free container label, compostable bags and details on what can and cannot go in the organics bin. You'll also receive the access code to enter the locked drop-off location. Anyone is welcome to participate, but the enclosure requires a code to prevent non-organic contamination. 

    2. Start Collecting Organic Waste                                                        

    You can use any container to collect organics such as:     

    • A small step containerBPI logo
    • A clean and empty ice cream bucket, coffee container, or other type of tub
    • A specially designed countertop organics container which can be purchased at local stores or online

    Line your container with a paper bag or certified compostable bags which are provided to residents for free at the drop-site. If you decide to purchase your own bags, make suCedar Grove Logore they have the BPIor Cedar Grove Logo on the bag.          

    When the bag is full, securely tie it closed and bring it to a drop-site near you. There are two locations in Dakota County Thompson County Park (360 Butler Ave, West St. Paul) or Lebanon Hills (opening November 3rd, Holland Lake Trailhead, 1100 Cliff Rd, Eagan).

    Accepted items:

    • All food, food scraps, peels, pits, etc.
    • Coffee grounds, filters and teabags
    • Paper towels, napkins and tissues   Food Scraps
    • Paper towel and toilet paper rolls
    • Paper egg cartons
    • Certified compostable products: Items with the BPI or Cedar Grove certified compostable logo on the product or packaging
    • Hair and fur
    • Popsicle sticks and toothpicks
    • Houseplant trimmings and flowers

    Not accepted

    • Yard waste
    • Plastic bags
    • Pet waste, litter, or bedding
    • Fast food wrappers
    • Frozen food boxes
    • Microwave popcorn bags
    • Paper plates, bowls and cups without BPI or Cedar Grove certification
    • Single-serve coffee pods (i.e., K-Cups® )

     

    Organics collected at these sites will be brought to a local organics recycling facility (The Mulch Store Specialized Environmental Technologies site) where it will be turned into compost; a nutrient-rich soil additive. Because the organics collected is brought to a commercial facility, meat, dairy, and bones are accepted among other food scrapes and napkins. Compost is beneficial because it improves soil quality, reduces erosion, and decreases the need for chemical fertilizers. Questions about this program? Visit the Dakota County webpage or call 952-891-7557. 

  • Recycle on the Go!

    Young Girl Recycling in Park

    Sport’s events, picnics, walks surrounded by nature: what else is in our parks? Recycling! The parks departments in Apple Valley, Burnsville, Eagan, and Lakeville are rolling out recycling containers in some parks making it easier than ever to recycle when you’re away from home.

  • Recycling Makes a Splash at Cascade Bay

    Recycling at Cascade Bay

    Cascade Bay Waterpark includes many fun-filled activities, making it a popular summer destination, and now there’s one more thing to get excited about – recycling! This year, Cascade Bay is introducing new, all-in-one trash and recycling containers that will make it easy for swimmers to discard items properly.

    The waterpark also offers delicious snacks and cool drinks, many of which are served in recyclable materials. With the new recycling containers, all the recycle goes into one, single recycling stream. This means plastic, aluminum, paper and cardboard can all be reused when placed into the recycling container. To make it even easier, the containers will also have labels with pictures to indicate which types of materials are accepted in the recycling.

    By paying attention to the signs on the containers, guests can relax on the lazy river knowing they are doing their part to keep the Earth and all of its water clean and healthy!

     Written by Erin Bucki, 2017 Graduate, School of Environmental Studies (pictured)

  • Recycling Myths Debunked

    The recycling world is not immune to myths but don't let these rumors stop you from making a difference. We have compiled the biggest fibs and explained how they just aren't true. 

    Myth 1: Recycling does not save natural resources

    Making products from recycled materials uses far less natural resources than manufacturing the same product from virgin (new) materials. For example, using one ton of recycled steel saves 2,500 pounds of ore, 1,400 pounds of coal, and 120 pounds of limestone from being mined. 

    Myth 2: Recyclables just get thrown away

    That's just plain illegal. County ordinance prohibits waste haulers from taking materials that have been collected as recycling to landfills or incinerators. All recycling in the Twin Cities is brought to one of many recycling facilities to get sorted and sold for further processing. 

    Myth 3: We already recycle everything we can

    Minnesotans are good recyclers, but we could be even better. A 2013 study found that a lot of paper, plastic, glass and metal is still put in the trash. In fact, nearly 50% of what was tossed could have been recycled. An additional 25% could have been composted. 

    Myth 4: Recycling is inconvenient

    Recycling has never been easier. County ordinance requires that all waste haulers offer recycling to their customers. That means recycling is literally at your doorstep. Drop-off sites like The Recycling Zone are located around the county to handle larger quantities of recyclables (like bulk cardboard).

    Myth 5: Mixing paper, cans and bottles in one cart ruins the recycling stream

    Single-sort recycling means putting all your glass, plastic, cans and paper into one bin. All recycling facilities can sort out and separate metals, glass, paper, and plastics to be baled and sent to the manufacturing market. There are still some items that shouldn't go into your curbside card like liquids, plastic bags, and batteries. 

    Myth 6: Recycling costs too much

    Recycling provides financial, economic and environmental benefits. The recycling industry provides 37,000 jobs in Minnesota alone. In fact, for every one job in the waste industry, four jobs are created in recycling. Using recycled products has many benefits for manufacturers. For instance, recycled glass extends the life of glass furnaces because less energy is needed. 

    Myth 7: All recyclables get shipped somewhere far away

    Many manufactures are located right here in Minnesota. Anchor Glass in Shakopee melts recycled glass to create new beverage containers. RockTenn in St. Paul recycles paper and cardboard into new paper. Gerdau-Ameristeel in South St. Paul recycles metal cans to make new metal products. 

    Myth 8: Recyclables aren't worth much, if anything

    Recyclable material has a tremendous economic value. In 2010, the 2.5 million tons of recyclables collected in Minnesota alone were worth $690 million. Recycling, like any business, must make a profit to keep the lights on and is affected by market values of materials. 

    Myth 9: One person cannot make a difference

    The average Minnesotan created seven pounds of waste every week. One person made that waste and one person can reduce it. Find out what your hauler accepts, and commit to reducing your waste and recycling more. 

Contact Us

City Education Department
13713 Frontier Court
Burnsville, MN 55337-3817
Phone: 952-895-4559

Dakota Valley Recycling

DVR is the partnership recycling department for the Cities of Apple Valley, BurnsvilleEagan and Lakeville that connects residents and businesses to recycling, composting and waste disposal information.

DVR is not a drop off facility and does not accept any materials for recycling.