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  • Whether it has been recycled or is just sitting in a landfill, nearly every piece of plastic ever created still exists in some form. The fraction of plastic that does get recycled is shockingly low, sitting at just about 30%. The vast majority that isn't being recycled is accumulating in landfills or ending up as litter in roadways and water systems. Our society is making a shift towards disposable and/or single-use plastics and, according the the National Geographic, if current trends continue we can expect about 12 billion metric tons of plastic to end up in landfills. It can be extremely hard to give up plastic entirely, but small shifts in our behavior can make a huge difference in reducing our plastic pollution.

    1. Reusable Bags Reusable Bag

    According to the EPA, Americans use over 380 billion plastic bags and wraps every year. Although there are plastic bag drop-offs for recycling, most bags end up in landfills. By switching to reusable bags for shopping and produce items, you could dramatically lower your need for plastic. 

    2. Reusable Water Bottle

    Americans use approximately 50 billion water bottles every year yet the recycling rate for plastic is only 23%. By bringing a reusable water bottle when you're at work, school, or on-the-go, you will reduce your need to buy a single-use plastic water bottle. Not only will you be saving natural resources but you will also save a lot of money over time. 

    3. Say No to Straws Straws

    500 million plastic drinking straws are used and disposed of every day. Many of these straws end up littering our road and waterways making them one of the most treacherous pollutants because of the harmful effects they have on marine animals. Next time you're out to eat or at a coffee shop, remember to ask for your drink without a straw. And, if you're with a group, encourage them to follow your lead! Change often starts with one person.

    4. Avoid the Microplastics Microbeads in Toothpaste

    Microplastics are tiny pieces of plastic (about the size of a sesame seed) that are found in many cosmetic and toiletry items including face wash and toothpaste. These small pieces of plastic get flushed down sinks and drains and end up in our water systems including oceans, lakes an rivers. Unfortunately, plastic does not break down or dissolve in water so it continues to pose a threat for marine life and birds. Studies are still being done to see what sort of long-term affects this might have on animal and human life, but what we do know is that avoiding it completely is a better option. 

    5. Pack In Or Pack Out Lunches

    If you normally eat out for lunch, try packing your own lunch in a reusable container instead. Not only will you save some money, but you'll also avoid any single use plastics that your food might otherwise come in. In addition, if you do go out to eat for lunch, consider bringing your own Tupperware to the restaurant for leftovers instead of using the disposable to-go containers. 

    6. Shop in Bulk Bins Bulk foods

    Many items such as nuts, fruits and beans are available in bulk bins which can be found at most grocery stores. By purchasing items from the bulk bins, you can avoid the single-use plastic that most items are wrapped in, and you can get the amount you need to avoid wasting food. Keep in mind that purchasing from bulk bins is not the same as buying in bulk because even though buying in bulk can be a better option to reduce excessive packaging, you'll find that you end up with more food than you need and it can be wasteful. 

    7. Buy Loose and Fresh Loose Fruit and Vegetables

    To go along with the tip above, buying fruits and veggies loose versus packaged will help lower your use of plastic. In addition, the small plastic bags that are available at grocery stores to put your food in is not at all necessary so if you're looking to use less plastic, you should skip them entirely. If you still prefer to bag your loose fruits and veggies, consider buying reusable produce bags to bring to the store with you. You can even find some that might increase the shelf life of certain foods! 

    8. Reusables at Parties Reusable cups and plates

    Parties and get-togethers are one of the most common places to see waste from disposable Styrofoam© plates and plastic silverware to one-time use decorations. Next time you host, consider using reusable and washable plates, cups and silverware instead of disposable. Not only will you reduce your waste, but it'll help make your party feel more personal and homey. In addition, if you do want to buy decorations, consider buying supplies that can be reused for years such as a universal "happy birthday" banner or cake topper.  

    9. Make Your Own Cleaners

    In the U.S. we generate 1.6 million tons of harmful household chemicals with the average home accumulating as much as 300 pounds of household hazardous waste. By making your own cleaner in a reusable bottle, you'll avoid the single use plastic bottles that most cleaners come in and you'll greatly decrease harmful chemicals in your home. For recipes on DIY green cleaners, visit our green cleaner guide

    10. Get it Fixed Fix-It Clinic Banner

    It's often easier for us to throw away common items when they break, but did you know you can get many of them fixed for free? In fact, every month Dakota County offers a free fix-it clinic where you can get expert help fixing common household items. Many residents have visited these clinics to fix old vacuum cleaners, broken fans, ripped clothing and so much more. To find an upcoming clinic near you, visit the Dakota County websiteand search "fix it."

     

  • Recycle Keyboard

    New Recycling Requirement for Businesses

    Starting January 1, 2016, recycling will be the law for many businesses. Commercial building owners operating or leasing to a retail establishment, restaurant, educational or professional service, health care service or any other business with a North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) code between 42 and 81 and contracting disposal of at least four cubic yards of solid waste per week must recycle at least three materials, such as paper, glass, plastic, metal and organics (food waste and soiled paper). 

  • The New Year is a time for resolutions that are made to bring about positive changes in your life. This year, make a difference in your community and start off the New Year right by adding some easy green resolutions to your list. Here are five ideas to help you get started:  scraping plate of food

    1. Reduce your food waste: 40% of food is currently being wasted in the United States. That means wasted resources, time, energy, and money. Reducing your food waste might be as easy as making smaller trips to the store with a clear list in mind, or just storing your food properly to make it last as long as possible. For more tips, visit our Reduce Your Food Waste Guide. 

    2. Reuse wfix-it clinic bannerith ease: Why buy something new when you can fix something you have for free? This year, resolve to attend a Dakota County Fix-It Clinic when you have something in need of repair. Clinics are offered every month in cities around Dakota County and you can bring up to five small household items such as torn clothing, broken vacuum cleaners, and more. 

    3. Recycle everything you can: This year, recycle more by using the hauler specific recycling guides found here. While you’re at it, make sure to recycle the things that can’t go in your curbside bin such as electronics by taking them to the Recycling Zone!

    4. Ditch the plastic: Approximately 50% of the plastic we use, we use once then throw away. Make 2018 the year you make a conscious effort to bring a reusable bag shopping and a reusable water bottle whenever possible. 

    5. Recycle your organics: Orgafood scrapsnic material such as food scraps and food-soiled paper don't have to end up in the landfill. Instead turn them into a rich soil  amendment by recycling them. Dakota County now has two free drop sites for your household organics. You can also resolve to backyard compost this year too! Find out how using our Backyard Composting Guide here

     

  • three stream recycling container

    The Burnsville Ames Center continues to "wow the crowds" with its newest venture: organics recycling. Guests at the Ames Center may notice the new, brightly colored bins around the venue that feature traditional recycling, trash, and a special spot just for organic waste.

    To make recycling easier, the new containers have labels showing what can be thrown where, and most of the items in the concession/bar have been switched to BPI-Certified compostable alternatives. While bottles, cans and paper handouts can continue to go in the regular blue recycling bin, things such as cups, plastic forks, napkins, apple cores, and most food containers can go into the green organics bin. Other items such as candy wrappers or chip bags should still go in the trash.

    Many of these new BPI-Certified compostable items are made of a plant based plastic and look like they could go in the recycling bin. However, in order for them to be turned into compost, they will need to go in the green bin with other compostable items. If you are unsure if the item you purchased is compostable, check the item for the BPI Logo or just ask any staff member at the Ames Center. 

    Organics recycling plays an essential role in keeping valuable materials out of landfills. Organics collected at the Ames Center will be brought to a local organics recycling facility to be turned into compost, a valuable soil additive. Compost improves soil quality, reduces erosion, reduces greenhouse gases, and decreases the need for chemical fertilizers. 

    So, next time you’re at the Ames Center, grab an ice cold refreshment and make to sure throw the whole cup in the green bin when you’re done- straw too!


  • Got a question about recycling? Not sure how to dispose of a household item?  Need information about yard waste sites, landfills, or The Recycling Zone?

    If your question isn't covered by the content on this website, contact us directly via email or call us at 952-895-4559. 

  • Camping and hiking are fantastic ways to adventure into and experience nature. Doing so in the summer lets us see plants and animals that don’t stick around in the winter. Although, sometimes we get so excited, we forget to plan accordingly and sustainably. It’s important to do this so that we can ensure nature remains if we want to keep exploring! Before you go out, take a look at these tips and tricks for camping in an environmentally friendly way. 

    1. Borrow gear and go reusable: To begin your trip, do what you can to buy used gear or borrow from friends. Not only will this save you money, but it's also Reusable platesvery eco-friendly. There's no need to invest in expensive equipment if you won't use it regularly. Reusable napkins, dishware, and silverware are essential, as is earth-friendly soap to wash them. Lastly, don't forget to pack all your food in a reusable container so that you aren't producing waste once you've eaten.

     2. Use non-toxic: No one likes to sport a sunburn or endure thick clouds of bugs, so you'll likely be bringing sunscreen and bug spray. When you do, keep in mind the flora and fauna around you that don't need that protection- bring non-toxic! Not only will the air, greenery, and animal life thank you for caring, but you'll also save yourself from breathing in harsh chemicals. 

    3. Pack it in, pack it out: Bring something to bring all of your waste in, or pack so that you don't generate waste. Cook with a portable portable camping stovestove so that you keep from impacting the ground with ash and burns from a fire. Campfires leave evidence of humans having been there and remember, you're the guest. If you do build a campfire, utilize the wood found on the ground or on your site- don't bring wood in to prevent the spread of invasive species. 

     4. Stay on the trail: Hiking is a great way to experience the naturally formed infrastructure around us, but remember we are visitors. Stay on the trail as you explore to prevent erosion and disruption of habitats of those who live there, plants and animals alike. Refrain from picking flowers and leave the rocks and logs alone. 

    5. Sleep sustainably: In your search of the perfect spot to lay your camp, keep in mind the softness of the ground. The softer it is, the more likely you are to Campers on rockprovoke erosion in that area. This means going for gravel, solidly packed dirt, or even a slab of rock. Choose a spot that is designated for camping by the forest or park you're in- there's no need to make a new campsite if one already exits. By being conscious of where you sleep, you'll minimize your footprint as well as any damage to the area.

     6. Skip the gadgets: For your own enjoyment and to fully experience what's out there, keep your gadgets at home. Watch the stars and listen to the sounds at night instead of bringing a laptop or portable dvd player. Bring a map instead of a cell phone or use your cell phone sparingly to keep from staring at a screen. Do all that you can to fully immerse yourself in the experience and joys of camping! 

  • Waste Less Banner

    Dakota County is currently revising its 2012-2030 Solid Waste Master Plan to properly manage trash, recyclables, food waste, and hazardous materials for 2017-2037. Dakota Valley Recycling is a part of this important effort that affects everyone in the County including residents, businesses, schools, organizations, haulers, and waste facilities. 

    First Round Complete

    Over 500 County residents and businesses provided input on key issues from November 2016 through February 2017. Take a look at the Round 1 results, which will shape the County’s draft waste management strategies. Curious about the project timeline? Check out the project overview here. 

    Your Voice Matters

    Later this spring, watch for Round 2 opportunities to provide your feedback on those draft strategies, and get more information on the Master Plan process on the County Solid Waste Master Plan website. Dakota County is using the County's Planning Commission as the advisory committee to periodically review recommendations. For more information refer to the Planning Commission's meeting minutes. 

     

  • Make your next event or gathering a green one! Dakota Valley Recycling can help you plan a low-waste event by providing free resources to residents and event planners. View the following guides to get started.

    Free Guides

    1. Planning a low waste event

    2. Reduce your waste guide for vendors

    3. Vendors that sell compostable products

    Borrow Supplies

    If you live in Apple Valley, BurnsvX-Frame Set-Upille, Eagan, or Lakeville, Dakota Valley Recycling also has free and easy to use recycling resources for your event including: 

    • Portable recycling, organics, and trash stations
    • Signs and banners
    • Bags and litter grabbers

    Contact Jackson Becker by email (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), or by phone (952-895-4511) to reserve equipment. Please note that for larger events requiring 10 or more frames/stations, we will direct you to use Dakota County resources

    Set up disposal

    In order to recycle what you collect, you will have to arrange for a pick up service through a licensed hauler. For a list of licensed commercial haulers, visit our hauler guide here

    If you collected organics during your event including food and compostable products, you must arrange a separate pick-up for the material to go to a commercial organics recycling site. You may set that service up with your selected hauler. If food and food scraps only were collected, you may place that in a backyard composter.

    If you collected any hazardous materials during your event including but not limited to paints, cleaners, fuels, and most products labeled dangerous, flammable, combustible, poisonous, or corrosive, you will need to bring these items to The Recycling Zone in Eagan. Residents are able to drop off hazardous waste for free during open business hours.  

  • Fix It Clinic Banner

    Have a broken item at home gathering dust? Come to a fix-it clinic where residents can bring up to 5 small items to be repaired or mended. Bring in small household electronics, clothing and more and receive free guided assistance to fix your items. Common items include coffee pots, fans, jewelry, and clothes with tears or holes.


    Saturday, August 18th
    Noon- 3:00 p.m.
    Robert Trail Library, Rosemount

    SUNDAY, September 16th
    Noon- 3:00 p.m.
    Wescott Library, Eagan

    Saturday, October 21st
    Noon- 3:00 p.m.
    Central Square Community Center, South St. Paul

    Saturday, November 17th
    Noon- 3:00 p.m.
    Wentworth Library, West St. Paul

    Saturday, December 8th
    11 a.m.- 2 p.m.
    Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, St. Paul 

    Volunteers Needed
    Want to share your skills with others looking to learn how to repair their items? Volunteer!
    For more information or to sign up, send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 612-867-6524.

  • Did you know that the volume of trash generally increases by 25% between Thanksgiving and New Years? Help reduce that waste with some easy reducing and recycling holiday tips. 

  • Did you know that aluminum foil and trays are 100% recyclable? In fact, they are just as recyclable as aluminum cans! The problem is, not all recycling centers accept foil and trays due to the fact that they often contain food waste which can contaminate collection. This leads to a reusable material ending up in a landfill where it takes about 400 years to break down.

  • From lithium ion to alkaline to zinc-carbon, there are many different types of batteries that you may encounter every day in your home. But do you know what to do with them?

    In many cases, you are able to bring your batteries directly back to the retailer. In Dakota County this includes but is not limited to: Target, Walmart, Home Depot, all car parts stores, Best Buy, RadioShack, Sams Club, Staples, Batteries Plus, and Lowe's. 

    Lithium Ion  Lithium Ion Battery

    Also known as a rechargeable battery, these batteries have become extremely common due to their convenience and cost savings. However, they do contain hazardous materials and are illegal to dispose of in your household garbage bin. Instead, place tape over the terminals and bring them to a retailer or the recycling zone to dispose of them for free.

    Alkaline Alkaline Battery

    Alkaline batteries are another very common household battery and come in many shapes, colors and sizes. Perhaps the common is the gold and black battery with the word “alkaline” written somewhere on the battery. These types of batteries can be disposed of in your household garbage bin, but they do contain valuable materials so it is better to bring them to The Recycling Zone to be recycled. These batteries are not accepted in your curbside recycling bin because they are too small and often get lost in the process or fall through the cracks in the materials recycling facility. When it comes to batteries, if in doubt- bring it to The Recycling Zone.

    Car Batteries    Car Battery

    Automotive batteries, also commonly referred to as lead-acid batteries, are large square lead blocks. These batteries are a type of lithium ion batteries and are illegal to dispose of in your household garbage bin. Instead, you can recycle them at your local automotive store, or take them to The Recycling Zone in Dakota County. 

    Nickel-Cadmium Batteries      Nickel Cadmium Battery

    Nickel-cadmium batteries are another type of rechargeable battery that uses nickel oxide hydroxide and metallic cadmium instead of lithium. These batteries are also illegal to throw away in your household garbage and must be disposed of responsibly either through a retail store or by bringing them into The Recycling Zone.   

    The Recycling Zone

    3365 Dodd Road (South Highway 149)
    Eagan, MN 55121
    651-905-4520

    For more information about materials accepted and hours, visit our Recycling Zone guide. 

    Battery Handling Tips

    • Store batteries in a vented plastic bucket or sturdy cardboard box away from light bulbs and other breakable items
    • Tape the terminals with electrical or plastic tape to prevent short circuiting
    • Older batteries may rust and leak. If a battery appears to be dirty or have a film around the terminals, use caution and do not touch the areas leaking. 
    • Always wash your hands after handling batteries or use gloves to prevent touching hazardous materials

     

  • Most plastic bags are made with materials that are recyclable, unfortunately this doesn’t mean they can go into your curbside bin. This includes grocery store plastic bags, zip lock bags, newspaper cover slips, bread loaf bags, and anything similar. Why? Because due to their size and shape, they end up clogging machines at recycling facilities. It just takes one bag to get caught and bring the entire operation to a halt, requiring an employee to remove the bag by hand; a time consuming, and possibly dangerous task. 

    So what do you do with them?

    Most retail and grocery stores offer free plastic bag drop-off bins for guests to use. Just take them there on your next trip! All you need to do is make sure it’s clean and remove any rigid parts including zippers, firm handles, and/or string ties. And of course, always try to reduce first by only taking plastic bags if you really need them.

    Plastic Bag Recycling

    Stores that offer plastic bag recycling at all locations

    Cub Foods, Target, Whole foods, Walmart (super-centers), Rainbow Foods

    *Some locations of Lunds & Byerlys, JCPenny’s, and Lowe’s also offer plastic bag recycling

    Frequently Asked Questions

    What if I put my recyclables in a plastic bag to prevent machines from clogging-can it be recycled then?

    Unfortunately no, the first step at many of these facilities is to sort the recyclables from any waste that might have found its way into the stream. If a recycling facility member sees a tied plastic bag, they most likely will assume its trash and throw it away.

    What kind of plastic bags can’t go in curbside-is it just plastic grocery bags?

    NO plastic bags (zip lock, grocery, film, newspaper slips, etc.) should go in curbside recycling. Take them to a retail location instead.

    Do all recycling/trash companies have the same rules?

    No, they do not. Some will accept things that others will not however, there are currently no haulers that accept plastic bags through curbside collection. Check out our curbside guide to see what your hauler collects!

  • Waste station at arenaThe Lakeville Ames Arena is aiming for a new goal: zero waste. The Arena's new waste system provides three options for disposing waste including traditional recycling, trash, and green organics bins. Hockey players and fans alike will notice new green bins around the arena including in the concessions, restrooms and spectating areas. 

    To make it easier, the containers all have photos showing what can be thrown where, and all of the items in the concessions have been switched to BPI-Certified compostable products that can be placed in the green bin. Of course, cans and water bottles should continue to go in the traditional blue recycling bin and everything else such as chip bags and candy wrappers belongs in the black trash bin. 

    Organics recycling plays an essential role in keeping valuable materials out of landfills. Organics collected at the Ames Arena will be brought to a local organics recycling facility to be turned into compost, a valuable soil additive. Compost improves soil quality, reduces erosion, reduces greenhouse gases, and decreases the need for chemical fertilizers. 

    Be sure to check out the Ames Arena's ongoing efforts towards zero-waste on your next trip to the rink! 

  • Dakota Valley Recycling (DVR) is excited to announce the addition of Lakeville to their multi-city recycling department. Lakeville joined the cities of Apple Valley, Burnsville and Eagan on Jan. 1, 2017.

    DVR will now provide recycling, composting and waste disposal information to residents and businesses in Lakeville in addition to the work that will continue in Apple Valley, Burnsville, and Eagan. DVR will also help coordinate a number of annual events including the Lakeville Household Hazardous Waste event in the spring.

     

  • September 25
    Instead of throwing Mr. Jack-o-Lantern in the trash, residents of Apple Valley, Burnsville, Eagan, and Lakeville can drop off their pumpkins at Dakota Valley Recycling's annual pumpkin composting...
    August 02
    1. Contact Lenses Through a program sponsored by Bausch + Lomb and TerraCycle, you can send in your used contact blister packs, top foil, and contact lenses to be recycled. Simply place any of these...
    August 01
    Coming to a Park Near You Sports tournaments, picnics, walks, playgrounds, nature: what else is in our parks? Recycling! The parks department in Burnsville is excited to announce the introduction of...
    July 26
    Whether it has been recycled or is just sitting in a landfill, nearly every piece of plastic ever created still exists in some form. The fraction of plastic that does get recycled is shockingly low,...
    July 06
    As more and more people turn to composting as a way to reduce their environmental impact, we are faced with a dilemma: is composting always better when it comes to paper? You may have heard that...
    July 03
    Join the Plastic Free July Challenge! By now you are probably aware of the extremely hazardous effects single-use plastics have on our environment and ecosystems once they are disposed of. Help ease...
    June 12
    Disposable wipes, used for changing baby diapers, personal hygiene, household cleaning, and more, are causing major issues for cities wastewater treatment stations. Although labeled ‘flushable’ or...
    June 11
    What is FOG? FOG is the fats, oils, and greases that are a by-product of cooking. FOG is found in meat fats, lard, cooking oil, shortening, butter/margarine, food scraps, baking goods, sauces, and...
    June 06
    The weather getting warmer not only means the beginning of summer, but also the beginning of summer break for school kids. With the school year ending, kids will be bringing home all of their work...
    April 02
    Recycling around the home has become easier than ever as more materials are being accepted by haulers and facilities. However, reusing or recycling parts of the home itself after a remodel isn't as...
    March 22
    The Lakeville Ames Arena is aiming for a new goal: zero waste. The Arena's new waste system provides three options for disposing waste including traditional recycling, trash, and green organics...
    March 05
    Make your next event or gathering a green one! Dakota Valley Recycling can help you plan a low-waste event by providing free resources to residents and event planners. View the following guides to...
    February 22
    A new year brought a few changes to ho w residents can recycle certain items. Dakota County no longer accepts plastic bags and packaging peanuts at The Recycling Zone in Eagan . As of Jan. 1, 2018...
    January 04
    The New Year is a time for resolutions that are made to bring about positive changes in your life. This year, make a difference in your community and start off the New Year right by adding some easy...
    January 01
    The recycling world is not immune to myths but don't let these rumors stop you from making a difference. We have compiled the biggest fibs and explained how they just aren't true. {slider Myth 1:...
    December 06
    Yo u may have seen new bins around your community featuring signs that say "organics only," but what does that mean? Organics recycling is the recycling of organic material - anything that was once...
    November 27
    This years' annual shoe recycling event has come and gone but with it came a new recycling record! In just one week with the help of Dakota County residents and the local textile recyclers,...
    November 14
    Did you know that the volume of trash generally increases by 25% between Thanksgiving and New Years? Help reduce that waste with some easy reducing and recycling holiday tips.

  • row of Christmas trees

    Once you've cleaned up for the holiday season, there are a number of ways to dispose of live greenery, such as trees, garlands and wreaths.

  • This year's Household Hazardous Waste Drop-Off Day has come and gone, but you have options for properly disposing of hazardous waste, electronics, and appliances year-round.

    Household Hazardous Wastesuch as aerosols, auto batteries, cleaners, fire extinguishers, fluorescent bulbs/tubes, gasoline, lawn chemicals, paint, pesticides, propane cylinders, rechargeable batteries, thermostats, used oil/filters, and most products labeled dangerous, corrosive, flammable, poison, or combustible.    household hazardous waste

    Electronicssuch as televisions, VCRs, DVD players, computers, computer monitors, printers, computer accessories, stereos, digital cameras, fax equipment, electronic gaming systems, cell phones and other miscellaneous electronic devices. TV's and computer monitors will be $10 each to recycle. bike and lawn mower

    Misc. Electric Household Itemssuch as vaccuum cleaners, carpet sweepers, coffee makers, blenders (without glass), mixers, bread makers, fryers, food sealing equipment, electric knives, clothes irons, shaving  equipment, hair dryers, VHS tapes, holiday lights, space heaters, radios, clocks, telephones, fans, cameras, toaster ovens, microwaves and misc. electric tools (drills, sanders, etc).  Batteries must be removed from all devices.

    stoveAppliancessuch as air conditioners, clothes washers, clothes dryers, hot water heaters, water softeners, garbage disposals, microwaves, trash compactors, stoves/ovens, furnaces, heat pumps, refrigerators, freezers, dehumidifiers and dishwashers.

    Scrap Metalsuch as lawn mowers, snow blowers and power tools (fluids MUST be drained), bicycles, metal grills (separate propane tank for HHW disposal) metal lawn furniture and other scrap metal items.

    Other Items:

    Carpet: for disposal of carpet and carpet padding, click here.

    Furniture: for reuse options of furniture in good condition, click here.  For disposal options, click here.

    Mattresses: for reuse or recycling options for mattresses, click here

    Ammonia-gas appliances (such as RV appliances): ammonia-powered appliances can be brought to JR's Advanced Recycling for a fee. For more information, click here.

    Still have questions about how to get rid of your unwanted stuff?  Call the recycling department at 952-895-4559 or send us an email

  • Starting August 1, Dakota County will charge a $10 fee to collect and recycle all types of televisions and computer monitors at The Recycling Zone. Residents will be able to pay with cash, check, Visa, or MasterCard.  

  • Dakota County has opened a new organics drop-site at Holland Lake Trailhead in Lebanon Hills. The drop site opened on November 3rd, 2017 and all Dakota County residents are welcome to sign up and participate in the program for free. For more information about the organics recycling program, go to www.co.dakota.mn.us and search organics drop off. 

    How to Participate

    1. Sign Up

    Call 952-891-7557 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    You'll receive a welcome kit with a free container label, compostable bags and details on what can and cannot go in the organics bin. You'll also receive the access code to enter the locked drop-off location. Anyone is welcome to participate, but the enclosure requires a code to prevent non-organic contamination. 

    2. Start Collecting Organic Waste                                                        

    You can use any container to collect organics such as:     

    • A small step containerBPI logo
    • A clean and empty ice cream bucket, coffee container, or other type of tub
    • A specially designed countertop organics container which can be purchased at local stores or online

    Line your container with a paper bag or certified compostable bags which are provided to residents for free at the drop-site. If you decide to purchase your own bags, make suCedar Grove Logore they have the BPIor Cedar Grove Logo on the bag.          

    When the bag is full, securely tie it closed and bring it to a drop-site near you. There are two locations in Dakota County Thompson County Park (360 Butler Ave, West St. Paul) or Lebanon Hills (opening November 3rd, Holland Lake Trailhead, 1100 Cliff Rd, Eagan).

    Accepted items:

    • All food, food scraps, peels, pits, etc.
    • Coffee grounds, filters and teabags
    • Paper towels, napkins and tissues   Food Scraps
    • Paper towel and toilet paper rolls
    • Paper egg cartons
    • Certified compostable products: Items with the BPI or Cedar Grove certified compostable logo on the product or packaging
    • Hair and fur
    • Popsicle sticks and toothpicks
    • Houseplant trimmings and flowers

    Not accepted

    • Yard waste
    • Plastic bags
    • Pet waste, litter, or bedding
    • Fast food wrappers
    • Frozen food boxes
    • Microwave popcorn bags
    • Paper plates, bowls and cups without BPI or Cedar Grove certification
    • Single-serve coffee pods (i.e., K-Cups® )

     

    Organics collected at these sites will be brought to a local organics recycling facility (The Mulch Store Specialized Environmental Technologies site) where it will be turned into compost; a nutrient-rich soil additive. Because the organics collected is brought to a commercial facility, meat, dairy, and bones are accepted among other food scrapes and napkins. Compost is beneficial because it improves soil quality, reduces erosion, and decreases the need for chemical fertilizers. Questions about this program? Visit the Dakota County webpage or call 952-891-7557. 

Contact Us

City Education Department
13713 Frontier Court
Burnsville, MN 55337-3817
Phone: 952-895-4559

Dakota Valley Recycling

DVR is the partnership recycling department for the Cities of Apple Valley, BurnsvilleEagan and Lakeville that connects residents and businesses to recycling, composting and waste disposal information.

DVR is not a drop off facility and does not accept any materials for recycling.